The skin / La peau

Is Infrared Light Bad For Your Skin?

Les Infrarouges Sont-Ils Mauvais Pour la Peau ?

English and Français

English 👆 / 👆 Français
français English language


We know that UVA and UVB, which are part of the ultraviolet spectrum, can be deleterious for the skin. That is why sunscreens incorporate UV filters to protect against those rays. Nonetheless, infrared is also part of the sunlight spectrum. Is it also bad for our skin? Let’s see what the science says!

If you are interested in knowing more about UVA and the UVB radiation, you can access my Ultraviolet and the Skin series which deals with:

Also, my other series called Sunscreens and Your Skin tells you:

  • how sunscreens protect against UV rays (Part 1),
  • what the differences are between organic and inorganic UV filters (Part 2),
  • and what the information like SPF, PPD, PA+, Broadspectrum… on the packaging mean (Part 3).


Pinterest Eng - Infrared light is it bad for your skin - le rayonnement infrarouge est il mauvais pour la peau

🇬🇧 Is Infrared Light Bad For Your Skin?

I’d like first to remind you a bit about the effects of the ultraviolet rays on the skin before going further to the infrared rays.

1. UVA and UVB radiation

UVA and UVB only counts for about 3% of the total sunlight reaching Earth’s surface.

FYI, visible light accounts for 44% at ground level and the remainder is infrared.

Of the ultraviolet radiation that passes the Earth’s atmosphere, more than 90% is UVA and less than 10% is UVB.

Nonetheless, for years, sunscreens commercially available had only been focusing on protecting against the UVB radiation. The reason was that those rays were causing sunburns, a short-term or acute visible reaction. When the long-term (chronic) damage caused by UVA were highlighted years after, especially skin cancer, photo-aging, and immune suppression, manufacturers started incorporating UVA filters in their sun products (1). Nowadays, improved filters against UVA and UVB rays available on the market have a broadspectrum protection.

Although the impacts of UV radiation on the skin have been extensively studied over the years, the consequences of infrared radiation (IR) have received far less attention.

Thumbnail - Infrared light is it bad for your skin - le rayonnement infrarouge est il mauvais pour la peau
UV and IR skin penetration
Source: www.daylong.ch

2. Infrared radiation (IR)

IR accounts for about 50% of the solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface.

It is divided into three ranges (in nanometer, nm):

  • IR-A (760nm–1400nm),
  • IR-B (1400nm–3000nm),
  • and IR-C (3000nm – 1 mm).

Those radiations can penetrate deeply into the skin, especially for IR-A, as seen on the image.

Exposure to IR is perceived as heat (2).

In vitro (cell culture samples) and in vivo (in real skin samples of humans or animals) studies have shown that IR has beneficial and deleterious effects on the skin:

  • On one hand, studies show that IR, and especially IR-A induces skin wrinkling, increases UV-induced wrinkle formation and decreases the antioxidant level of human skin through an oxidative stress response leading to premature photoaging (3,4).
  • On the other hand,

    • it has been demonstrated that it can induce skin tone improvement, reduce wrinkles and increase the skin elasticity by augmenting the amount of collagen and elastic fibers produced by the skin (5,6). For that purpose, it is used in skin rejuvenation therapies.
    • IR is also well known to promote healing processes of wounds for decades now and is also used in therapies on patients (7).

Feeling a bit lost?

==> To clear things a bit up, a recent 2015 review exposed that many studies showing negative impacts of IR irradiation used artificial light sources which intensity is much greater than that found in natural sunlight (beyond 100 mW/cm2 which would cause heat pains on exposed skin). For the authors of the review, those studies are thus not representative of real-life IR irradiation and must be taken carefully (8).

As mentioned in my this article, where I have already briefly talked about IR, more studies must be conducted in realistic IR exposure to fully assess the deleterious effects of IR but as of today, science is not positive about them.

Nonetheless, some commercial brands, for example Make P:rem with their UV Defense Me Blue Ray Sun Gel, have already added protection against IR by cooling down the skin to maximize photoprotection.

3. What to remember?

  • Infrared radiation is part of the invisible spectrum of sunlight, like ultraviolet rays.
  • It is divided into 3 ranges, IR-A, IR-B and IR-C. IR-A can penetrate the skin deeper than UV rays and is the most concerning IR.
  • However, more studies are needed to positively show that IR affects the skin negatively under real-life conditions, as actual artificial light used in testing is not representative of the IR natural sunlight exposure.

Do you specifically protect your skin against infrared rays? Why? Leave a comment below!

This post contains affiliate links. If you choose to financially support thenerdylab.com at no extra cost to you, thank you!

Related Post

UV filters to watch out! Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 4—Les filtres UV à surveiller ! Les Protections solaires et la peau – 4ème Partie 🇬🇧 Are you worried about the safety of the sunscreen's filters? Discover those the most concerning and why. 🇫🇷 Vous vous interrogez sur l'innocuité des filtres UV ? Découvrez ceux les moins recommand...
SPF, PA+, PPD explained Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 3—FPS, PA+, PPD pour les nuls Les Protections solaires et la peau – 3ème Partie 🇬🇧 When choosing a sunscreen, what do the numbers and information mean on the packaging? 🇫🇷 A l'achat d'une crème solaire, que signifient les informations et chiffres sur le produit ?
Organic (Chemical) vs Inorganic (Physical) Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 2—Filtres Chimiques vs Physiques Les Protections solaires et la peau – 2ème Partie 🇬🇧 Wonder what the differences between organic and inorganic UV filters in sunscreens are? This article answers that question. 🇫🇷 Curieux(se) de connaître les différences entre les filtres organiques...
How Broadspectrum Sunscreens work Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 1—Comment les crèmes solaires fonctionnent Les Protections solaires et la peau – 1ère Partie 🇬🇧 Do you know how sunscreens work? In this part 1 article, we'll see what broadspectrum sunscreens means and what the filters used are. 🇫🇷 Savez-vous comment les solaires fonctionnent ? Dans ce 1er ...




Français
Français

français Les UVA et UVB, faisant partie du spectre ultraviolet, peuvent ĂŞtre dĂ©lĂ©tères pour la peau. C’est pourquoi les industriels incorporent des filtres UV dans leurs produits solaires qui protègent contre ces rayons. Qu’en est-il du rayonnement infrarouge, faisant Ă©galement partie du spectre de la lumière ? Son rayonnement est-il aussi mauvais pour notre peau ?

Si vous souhaitez découvrir les rayons UVA et UVB, vous pouvez accéder à la série Les Ultraviolets et la Peau qui traite des sujets scientifiques suivants :

Vous pouvez aussi accéder à la série Les Solaires et la Peau qui porte sur :

  • comment les solaires protègent contre les rayons UVA et UVB (1ère Partie),
  • les diffĂ©rences entre les filtres UV organiques et inorganiques (2ème Partie),
  • et ce que SPF, PPD, PA +, Broadspectrum… sur l’emballage des produits signifient (3ème Partie).

Pinterest Fr - Infrared light is it bad for your skin - le rayonnement infrarouge est il mauvais pour la peau

🇫🇷 Rayonnement Infrarouge : bon ou mauvais pour la peau ?

Avant d’attaquer les infrarouges et afin de donner un peu plus de contexte, je vous propose un petit rappel sur les effets des rayons ultraviolets sur la peau.

1. Rayonnement UVA et UVB

Les UVA et UVB ne comptent que pour environ 3% des rayons solaires atteignant la surface de la Terre.

Pour information, la lumière visible représente 44% de la lumière atteignant le sol, et le reste est du rayonnement infrarouge.

Pour revenir aux ultraviolets traversant l’atmosphère terrestre : plus de 90% sont des UVA, et moins de 10%, des UVB.

NĂ©anmoins, et pendant des annĂ©es, les produits solaires disponibles dans le commerce se focalisaient uniquement sur les UVB. La raison en Ă©tait que ces rayons causaient des coups de soleil, une rĂ©action visible arrivant Ă  court terme. Lorsque les dĂ©gâts sur le long terme (chroniques) causĂ©s par les UVA ont Ă©tĂ© mis en Ă©vidence plus tard, en particulier les cancers de la peau, le photo-vieillissement et l’immunosuppression, les fabricants ont commencĂ© Ă  inclure des filtres UVA dans leurs produits solaires (1). De nos jours, les filtres UVA et UVB disponibles sur le marchĂ© sont amĂ©liorĂ©s et permettent une protection Ă  spectre large.

Bien que les effets des rayons UV sur la peau aient Ă©tĂ© Ă©tudiĂ©s depuis longtemps, les consĂ©quences du rayonnement infrarouge ont reçu moins d’attention.

Thumbnail - Infrared light is it bad for your skin - le rayonnement infrarouge est il mauvais pour la peau
La profondeur cutanée atteinte par les UV et IR
Source : www.daylong.ch

2. Rayonnement infrarouge (IR)

L’IR reprĂ©sente environ 50% du rayonnement solaire atteignant la surface de la Terre.

Il est divisé en trois plages :

  • IR-A (760 nm – 1400 nm),
  • IR-B (1400 nm – 3000 nm),
  • et IR-C (3000 nm – 1 mm).

Ces radiations peuvent pĂ©nĂ©trer profondĂ©ment dans la peau, en particulier les IR-A, comme on peut le voit sur l’image.

Une exposition aux IR est perçue comme une source de chaleur (2).

Des Ă©tudes in vitro et in vivo ont montrĂ© que l’IR a des effets bĂ©nĂ©fiques et dĂ©lĂ©tères sur la peau :

  • D’une part, des Ă©tudes montrent que l’IR, et surtout l’IR-A semble participer Ă  la formation des rides en augmentant celles induites par les UV et en diminuant les concentrations d’antioxydant cutanĂ© par une Ă©lĂ©vation du stress oxydatif, ce qui provoque un photo-vieillissement accĂ©lĂ©rĂ© (3, 4).
  • D’autre part,

    • il a aussi Ă©tĂ© dĂ©montrĂ© que l’exposition Ă  l’IR conduisait Ă  une amĂ©lioration du teint, Ă  la rĂ©duction des rides et Ă  l’augmentation de l’Ă©lasticitĂ© cutanĂ©e par l’augmentation de la formation de collagène et de fibres Ă©lastiques produites naturellement par la peau (5, 6). L’IR est ainsi utilisĂ© dans les thĂ©rapies de rajeunissement de la peau,
    • l’IR est Ă©galement bien connu pour promouvoir la guĂ©rison des plaies depuis des dĂ©cennies et est Ă©galement utilisĂ© en thĂ©rapie Ă  cette fin (7).

Vous sentez-vous un peu perdu ?

==> Pour clarifier un peu les choses, une Ă©tude de 2015 a rĂ©vĂ©lĂ© que de nombreuses Ă©tudes soulignant les impacts nĂ©gatifs de de l’IR utilisaient des sources lumineuses artificielles dont l’intensitĂ© est beaucoup plus Ă©levĂ©e que celle du soleil (plus de 100 mW/cm2, intensitĂ© causant des brĂ»lures sur la peau exposĂ©e). Pour les auteurs de la revue, ces Ă©tudes ne sont donc pas reprĂ©sentatives de l’irradiation IR rĂ©elle et doivent donc ĂŞtre considĂ©rĂ©es avec recul (8).

Comme mentionnĂ© dans cet article, oĂą j’ai dĂ©jĂ  brièvement parlĂ© du rayonnement IR, d’autres Ă©tudes doivent ĂŞtre menĂ©es avec des conditions d’exposition Ă  l’IR plus rĂ©alistes afin d’Ă©valuer pleinement les effets dĂ©lĂ©tères de l’IR. Ainsi, Ă  ce jour, la science n’est pas catĂ©gorique dessus.

Néanmoins, certaines marques, par exemple Make P:rem (UV Défense Me Blue Ray Sun Gel) ont déjà ajouté une protection IR pour maximiser la photoprotection.

3. Quoi retenir

  • Le rayonnement infrarouge fait partie du spectre invisible de la lumière du soleil, comme les rayons ultraviolets.
  • Il est divisĂ© en trois plages, l’IR-A, l’IR-B et l’IR-C. l’IR-A peut pĂ©nĂ©trer la peau plus profondĂ©ment que les rayons UV et est donc celui qui entretient le plus d’inquiĂ©tudes.
  • Cependant, des Ă©tudes supplĂ©mentaires dans des conditions d’exposition rĂ©alistes semblent nĂ©cessaires pour pouvoir dĂ©montrer un effet cutanĂ© dĂ©lĂ©tère de l’IR, car la lumière artificielle utilisĂ©e dans les Ă©tudes n’est pas reprĂ©sentative de l’exposition naturelle au rayonnement infrarouge.

Protégez-vous spécifiquement votre peau contre les rayons infrarouges ? Pourquoi ? Laissez un commentaire ci-dessous !

Cet article contient des liens d’affiliation. Vous pouvez choisir de soutenir financièrement TheNerdyLab.com en achetant les produits, sans frais supplémentaire pour vous. Merci !

4. References

(1) UVA and UVB, Skin Cancer Foundation

(2) Schieke SM, 2003, Cutaneous effects of infrared radiation: from clinical observations to molecular response mechanisms, Review in Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed., 19(5):228-34.

(3) Kim HH, 2005, Augmentation of UV-induced skin wrinkling by infrared irradiation in hairless mice, Review in Mech Ageing Dev., 126(11):1170-7.

(4) Schroeder P, 2008, Infrared radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase in human skin: implications for protection, Review in J Invest Dermatol, 128(10):2491-7.

(5) Lee SY, 2007, A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, and split-face clinical study on LED phototherapy for skin rejuvenation: clinical, profilometric, histologic, ultrastructural, and biochemical evaluations and comparison of three different treatment settings, Review in J Photochem Photobiol B., 88(1):51-67.

(6) Lee JH, 2006, Effects of infrared radiation on skin photo-aging and pigmentation, Review in Yonsei Med J., 47(4):485-90.

(7) Avci P, 2013, Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring, Review in Semin Cutan Med Surg., 32(1):41-52.

(8) Daniel Barolet, 2015, Infrared and Skin: Friend or Foe, Review in J Photochem Photobiol B., 155: 78–85.

(9) Lien Ai Pham-Huy, 2008, Free Radicals, Antioxidants in Disease and Health, Review in Int J Biomed Sci., 4(2): 89–96.

Related Post

UV filters to watch out! Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 4—Les filtres UV à surveiller ! Les Protections solaires et la peau – 4ème Partie 🇬🇧 Are you worried about the safety of the sunscreen's filters? Discover those the most concerning and why. 🇫🇷 Vous vous interrogez sur l'innocuité des filtres UV ? Découvrez ceux les moins recommand...
SPF, PA+, PPD explained Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 3—FPS, PA+, PPD pour les nuls Les Protections solaires et la peau – 3ème Partie 🇬🇧 When choosing a sunscreen, what do the numbers and information mean on the packaging? 🇫🇷 A l'achat d'une crème solaire, que signifient les informations et chiffres sur le produit ?
Organic (Chemical) vs Inorganic (Physical) Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 2—Filtres Chimiques vs Physiques Les Protections solaires et la peau – 2ème Partie 🇬🇧 Wonder what the differences between organic and inorganic UV filters in sunscreens are? This article answers that question. 🇫🇷 Curieux(se) de connaître les différences entre les filtres organiques...
How Broadspectrum Sunscreens work Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 1—Comment les crèmes solaires fonctionnent Les Protections solaires et la peau – 1ère Partie 🇬🇧 Do you know how sunscreens work? In this part 1 article, we'll see what broadspectrum sunscreens means and what the filters used are. 🇫🇷 Savez-vous comment les solaires fonctionnent ? Dans ce 1er ...

Leave a reply / Laisser un commentaire

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * / Votre adresse mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs requis sont accompagnés de *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.