The skin / La peau

Organic (Chemical) vs Inorganic (Physical)
Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 2


Filtres Chimiques vs Physiques
Les Protections solaires et la peau – 2ème Partie


English and Français

English 👆 / 👆 Français

français English language



Sunscreens are a must if you want to prevent photoaging.

After introducing Sunscreens 101 in Part 1, emphasized on what a broadspectrum sunscreen is and what kinds of filters are used, I’d like to focus on the differences between organic (or chemical) and inorganic (or physical) sunscreens. To wrap that part, I also discuss about micronisation, a technique used on inorganic filters, especially to avoid white cast (if you have no idea what this is, don’t worry, it’ll be explained) but under questions for safety reasons.

This article is part of the in-process Sunscreens and Your Skin series which deals with everything related to sunscreens (how they work, how to use them, how to choose them…).

In the other articles from the series, I have discussed:

  • in Part 3, about the meaning of SPF, PPD, PA+… labeled on the packaging of a sunscreen.
  • in Part 4, about some organic filters showing health risks.

If you are interested to know what sunscreens protect from, namely UV rays, you can access the thematic Ultraviolets and the Skin series.


Pinterest - Chemical organic vs physical inorganic - sunscreens and your skin - Part2 - chimiques vs physiques Les protections solaires et la peau - 2èle partie

🇬🇧 Organic (chemical) vs inorganic (physical) sunscreens

1. What are they?

In sunscreens, protection is provided by the filters incorporated in the product. Those are called active agents and their proportion in the formula determines the protection factors against UVA and UVB rays, responsible for photoaging and skin cancers.

Before diving into the pros and cons of each type of filters, let me remind you what these active agents are (you can also access Part 1 which introduces them):

  • Organic filters are organic molecules (usually containing a carbon atom). They absorb UV radiation within a specific range of wavelengths depending on their chemical structure and release the energy as lower-energy rays or by vibrating, thus preventing UV radiation from reaching the skin.
    Avobenzone, octinoxate or Mexoryl XL are chemical type. They can be referred to as chemical absorbers.
  • Inorganic filters reflect, scatter and absorb UV rays: they contain inert minerals such as titanium dioxide or zinc oxide. They can be referred to as physical blockers.

Each filter, chemical or physical, protects the skin from a specific range of the UV rays (UVA, UVB or both). To ensure the widest protection (broadspectrum), ranging from 290 nm to 400 nm of the UV spectrum, they are usually combined into full chemical, full physical or chemical-physical formulas.

Note

Protection factors are measured with standardized protocols meaning that, when you compare sunscreens, an SPF 30 in one brand gives the same UVB protection as another sunscreens also labeled SPF 30 in another brand whatever the filters used are.

Nevertheless, If we set aside those labels giving information about the UVA and the UVB protection, one can pinpoint differences between organic and inorganic sunscreens.

2. Advantages and drawbacks of each type of filter

The table below indicates, for each type of filter, the pros (in green) and cons (in red) for several concerns. I have also put the meaning of certain terms below the table.

Concern Organic or chemical filters Inorganic or physical filters
Cosmetic texture More cosmetic friendly: the texture can be thinner and spreads more easily on the skin. Also, there is no white cast after application (see below for the meaning) making them more wearable for everybody. Less cosmetic friendly: the texture is thicker and more difficult to spread on the face evenly. Also, they can leave a white cast (see below for the meaning) making them less wearable for people with darker skin tones.
However, if micronized (reduced in nanoparticles), the filters are more cosmetic friendly.
Photostability Less photostable under light: under sunlight, the protection can diminish, making them less protective through the day (1) without reapplication. More photostable under light: the protection provided by the filters do not change under sunlight.
Irritations Can be irritant: Studies showed that those filters can provoke allergies and irritations to the skin (3). The higher the SPF, the more irritative the sunscreen can be due to higher proportions of chemical filters. inert: Studies showed less allergies and irritations as those filters are more inert to the skin, which can be interesting for sensitive skins (2), except when the product contains nanoparticles.
Other health concerns Oxydation: some studies showed that those filters can release free radicals when absorbing UV radiation which can damage the cell’s DNA (1).
Endocrine disruptor: Octinoxate (Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate) and oxybenzone have shown to have hormone-mimicking properties which can lead to developmental disorders (6).
Micronisation: if the filters are micronized (between 15 and 50 nm), they are suspected to penetrate the skin layers (see Health concerns over micronisation below for more information).
Reapplication? Yes, the sunscreen has to be reapplied at least every 2 hours when you are out in the sun, more if there are physical activities (5). Yes, the sunscreen has to be reapplied at least every 2 hours when you are out in the sun, more if there are physical activities (5).
Organic (Chemical) vs Inorganic (Physical) filters for several concerns

 

White cast: a semi-opaque or chalky layer left by sunscreens on the skin which formula contains inorganic filters, like titanium dioxide or zinc oxide. This can be incompatible with medium to dark skin toned people or leave a grey undertone under makeup.

custom -White Cast - Chemical organic vs physical inorganic - sunscreens and your skin - Part2 - chimiques vs physiques Les protections solaires et la peau - 2èle partie
Slight white cast for that sunscreen

To conclude the comparison, industrials can get the most out of the filters by combining them.

3. Health concerns over micronisation

a. Safety information

To avoid the white layer induced by inorganic filters and increase the photoprotection, TiO2 (titanium dioxide) and ZnO (Zinc oxide) are micronized to particles below 200nm in size. At this dimension, the particles have different interactions with their environment and may be no longer inert: TiO2 has indeed been categorized as 2B carcinogen “possibly carcinogen to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), being responsible for lung cancers for people working in a dusty environment (4). On the other hand, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA consider the TiO2 particles safe when used in UV filters.

TiO2 nanoparticles
Image 5 — TiO2 nanoparticles
Source

b. Skin penetration

In vitro (in human cell culture) and in vivo (in real human skin samples) experiments done with nanoparticles of TiO2 and ZnO showed that on a healthy skin, nanoparticles could be detected but in the upper part only. However, on impaired skin barrier (psoriatic skin for example), a deeper penetration was shown for a few particles.
Experts emphasize the fact that more studies must be conducted to understand the penetration mechanisms and the impacts on the body. On top of that, there are existing approaches to counter those risk, like using coating agents that isolate the particles and thus minimize the interactions with the skin (7).

4. What to remember

In addition to the advice provided in Part 1, please keep in mind the following:
Each type of filter has pros and cons concerning the cosmetic texture, the photostability or health concerns:

  • organic filters are more cosmetic friendly but are less photostable and can have irritative and some are suspected to be endocrine disruptors,
  • inorganic filters are less cosmetic friendly if not micronized but are more photostable and inert. Hence, choosing a full inorganic sunscreen can be a good choice for people having sensitive skins,
  • nanoparticles are more and more used but it is still not clear if they are harmful to our health when they penetrate the skin layers.

In the next articles, I will focus on the packaging labels so that you’ll be able to choose the right product and on some chemical ingredients (that I have talked briefly here) that you might need to watch out.

Do you prefer organic, inorganic or combined sunscreens? Leave a comment!

Related Post

UV filters to watch out! Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 4—Les filtres UV à surveiller ! Les Protections solaires et la peau – 4ème Partie 🇬🇧 Are you worried about the safety of the sunscreen's filters? Discover those the most concerning and why. 🇫🇷 Vous vous interrogez sur l'innocuité des filtres UV ? Découvrez ceux les moins recommand...
SPF, PA+, PPD explained Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 3—FPS, PA+, PPD pour les nuls Les Protections solaires et la peau – 3ème Partie 🇬🇧 When choosing a sunscreen, what do the numbers and information mean on the packaging? 🇫🇷 A l'achat d'une crème solaire, que signifient les informations et chiffres sur le produit ?
How Broadspectrum Sunscreens work Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 1—Comment les crèmes solaires fonctionnent Les Protections solaires et la peau – 1ère Partie 🇬🇧 Do you know how sunscreens work? In this part 1 article, we'll see what broadspectrum sunscreens means and what the filters used are. 🇫🇷 Savez-vous comment les solaires fonctionnent ? Dans ce 1er ...
Is Infrared Light Bad For Your Skin?—Les Infrarouges Sont-Ils Mauvais Pour la Peau ? 🇬🇧 Infrared is part of sunlight. Is it bad for our skin like ultraviolet rays? Let’s see what the science says! 🇫🇷 Le rayonnement infrarouge du soleil est-il mauvais pour la peau ? Voyons ce qu'en di...




Français
Français

français Utiliser des produits solaires est primordial quand il s’agit de prévenir le photo-vieillissement.

Dans la 1ère partie, il Ă©tait question de solaires “Ă  large spectre” protĂ©geant des UVA et des UVB ainsi qu’une introduction aux filtres organiques (chimiques) et inorganiques (physiques). Aujourd’hui, nous verrons plus en dĂ©tail les diffĂ©rences entre les deux types de filtres, ce qui permettra de vous aider Ă  faire votre choix lors de l’achat. Pour clĂ´turer cet article, un paragraphe est dĂ©diĂ© Ă  la micronisation, une technique utilisĂ©e sur les filtres inorganiques, pour Ă©viter notamment les traces blanches laissĂ©es par les minĂ©raux mais qui est sujet aux interrogations sur son innocuitĂ©.

Cet article fait partie de la sĂ©rie thĂ©matique les Protections Solaires et la Peau qui traite de tous les sujets relatifs aux solaires (comment ils fonctionnent, comment les utiliser, comment les choisir…).

Dans les parties suivantes, je discute :

  • de ce que signifie les informations et chiffres disponibles sur le produit (SPF, PA+, PPD…) –> 3ème Partie.
  • des filtres organiques prĂ©sentant un risque pour votre santĂ© –> 4ème Partie .

Savez exactement de quoi nous protègent les solaires ? Pour le savoir, vous pouvez accéder à la série les Ultraviolets et la Peau.

Pinterest FR - Chemical organic vs physical inorganic - sunscreens and your skin - Part2 - chimiques vs physiques Les protections solaires et la peau - 2èle partie

🇫🇷 Les filtres solaires organiques (chimiques) et inorganiques (physiques)

1. Que sont-ils ?

Dans une crème solaire, la protection est assurée par les filtres UV incorporés dans le produit. Ceux-ci sont des agents actifs et leur proportion dans la formule détermine les facteurs de protection contre les rayons UVA et UVB, responsables du photo-vieillissement et du cancer de la peau.

Avant de nous plonger dans les avantages et les inconvénients de chaque type de filtre, je vous fais un rappel de ces agents actifs (vous pouvez également accéder à la 1ère Partie qui les introduit):

  • Les filtres organiques sont des molĂ©cules contenant un atome de carbone. Ils absorbent le rayonnement UV dans une plage de longueurs d’onde qui leur est spĂ©cifique en fonction de leur structure chimique. Ils dissipent ensuite l’énergie par des vibrations ou en rĂ©Ă©mettant une radiation moins dangereuse pour la peau, ce qui empĂŞche les UV d’atteindre la surface de la peau.
    Les filtres avobenzone, octinoxate ou Mexoryl XL sont de type chimique.
  • Les filtres inorganiques rĂ©flĂ©chissent, dispersent et absorbent les rayons UV: ils contiennent des minĂ©raux inertes tels que le dioxyde de titane ou l’oxyde de zinc.

Chaque filtre, chimique ou physique, protège la peau dans une gamme spécifique des rayons UV (UVA, UVB ou les deux). Pour assurer la protection la plus large (à large spectre), allant de 290 nm à 400 nm du spectre UV, les filtres sont généralement combinés en une formule exclusivement chimique, exclusivement physique ou alliant les deux types.

Note

Les indices UV sont mesurés selon des protocoles standardisés, ce qui signifie que lorsque vous comparez les filtres solaires entre eux, par exemple deux produits avec un FPS 30 dans des marques différentes, ils garantissent la même protection contre les UVB et ce, quels que soient les filtres utilisés.

Néanmoins, si nous mettons de côté ces informations indiquant la protection contre les UVA et UVB, nous pouvons tout de même identifier des différences entre les filtres solaires organiques et inorganiques.

2. Avantages et inconvénients des filtres organiques et inorganiques

Le tableau ci-dessous indique, pour chaque type de filtre, les avantages (en vert) et les inconvénients (en rouge) liés à diverses problématiques.

Problématique Filtres organiques ou chimiques Filtres inorganiques ou physiques
Texture Plus agrĂ©able : la texture peut ĂŞtre plus fine et s’Ă©tale plus facilement sur la peau. De plus, il n’y a pas de rĂ©sidu semi-opaque ou blanc après l’application, ce qui les rend plus faciles Ă  porter pour tout le monde. Moins agrĂ©able : la texture est plus Ă©paisse et plus difficile Ă  Ă©taler uniformĂ©ment sur le visage. De plus, ils peuvent laisser des traces blanches, les rendant moins esthĂ©tiques pour les personnes ayant une peau plus foncĂ©e.
Cependant, s’ils sont micronisĂ©s (rĂ©duits en nanoparticules), les filtres ne laissent plus de traces blanches.
PhotostabilitĂ© Moins photostable sous la lumière : sous la lumière du soleil, leur protection peut diminuer, les rendant moins protecteurs (1) s’il n’y a pas de rĂ©application. Plus photostable sous la lumière : la protection fournie par les filtres ne change pas sous les rayons du soleil.
Irritations Peut ĂŞtre irritant : Des Ă©tudes montrent que ces filtres peuvent provoquer des allergies et des irritations de la peau (3). Plus le FPS est Ă©levĂ©, plus la crème solaire peut ĂŞtre irritante en raison d’une concentration plus Ă©levĂ©e en filtres chimiques. Inerte : Les Ă©tudes montrent moins d’allergies et d’irritations car ces filtres sont plus inertes pour la peau, ce qui peut ĂŞtre intĂ©ressant pour les peaux sensibles (2) sauf si le produit contient des nanoparticules.
Autres problĂ©matiques de santĂ© Oxydation : certaines Ă©tudes montrent que ces filtres peuvent libĂ©rer des radicaux libres lors de l’absorption du rayonnement UV qui peuvent endommager l’ADN des cellules ( 1 ).
Perturbateur endocrinien : L’octinoxate (Ă©thylhexyl mĂ©thoxycinnamate) et l’oxybenzone peuvent imiter certaines molĂ©cules hormonales, ce qui peut entraĂ®ner des troubles du dĂ©veloppement (6).
Micronisation : si les filtres sont micronisĂ©s sous forme de nanoparticules (entre 15 et 50 nm), ils sont suspectĂ©s de pĂ©nĂ©trer les couches cutanĂ©es (Cf. 3. Micronisation et potentiels risques de santĂ© ci-dessous pour plus d’informations
RĂ©application nĂ©cessaire ? Oui, le produit solaire doit ĂŞtre rĂ©appliquĂ© au moins toutes les 2 heures lorsque vous ĂŞtes au soleil, plus s’il y a des activitĂ©s physiques (5). Oui, le produit solaire doit ĂŞtre rĂ©appliquĂ© au moins toutes les 2 heures lorsque vous ĂŞtes au soleil, plus s’il y a des activitĂ©s physiques (5).
Filtres organiques (chimiques) vs inorganiques (physiques) concernant plusieurs problématiques

 

custom -White Cast - Chemical organic vs physical inorganic - sunscreens and your skin - Part2 - chimiques vs physiques Les protections solaires et la peau - 2èle partie
Légères traces blanches après application de la crème solaire

Pour conclure la comparaison, les industriels peuvent tirer le meilleur parti des filtres en les combinant.

2. Micronisation et potentiels risques de santé

a. Innocuité

Pour Ă©viter le film blanc laissĂ© par les filtres inorganiques et augmenter la photoprotection, le TiO2 et ZnO sont micronisĂ©s Ă  des dimensions infĂ©rieures Ă  200 nm. Ă€ cette taille, les particules rĂ©agissent diffĂ©remment avec leur environnement et donc peuvent ne plus ĂŞtre inertes : le TiO2 a en effet Ă©tĂ© classĂ© comme cancĂ©rogène 2B « potentiellement cancĂ©rogène pour l’homme » par l’Agence internationale pour la recherche sur le cancer (CIRC), car reconnu responsable de cancers du poumon sur des personnes ayant travaillĂ© dans un environnement poussiĂ©reux (4). D’un autre cĂ´tĂ©, la Food and Drug Administration (FDA) aux États-Unis considère que les particules de TiO2 peuvent ĂŞtre utilisĂ©es en toute sĂ©curitĂ© dans les filtres UV.

Nanoparticules de TiO2
Nanoparticules de TiO2
Source

b. Pénétration dans la peau

Des expériences in vitro (effectuées dans des cultures de cellules humaines) et in vivo (réalisées sur des échantillons de peau humaine) avec les nanoparticules de TiO2 et ZnO montrent que sur une peau saine, des nanoparticules ont été détectées dans les couches supérieures de la peau. Cependant, sur une barrière cutanée altérée (peau psoriasique par exemple), une pénétration dans les couches plus profondes a été observée à de faibles volumes néanmoins.
Les scientifiques soulignent que d’autres Ă©tudes doivent ĂŞtre menĂ©es pour comprendre les mĂ©canismes de pĂ©nĂ©tration ainsi que les consĂ©quences sur le corps et qu’il existe aujourd’hui des solutions pour contrer ces risques, comme l’utilisation d’agents d’enrobage qui isolent la particule et minimisent ainsi les intĂ©ractions avec la peau (7).

4. Que retenir

En plus des conseils fournis dans la 1ère Partie, il est suggéré de retenir les points suivants :
Chaque type de filtre possède des avantages et des inconvénients liés à la texture du produit, sa photostabilité ou ses problématiques de santé :

  • les filtres organiques sont plus esthĂ©tiques mais moins photostables ; il peuvent aussi provoquer des irritations et certains sont suspectĂ©s d’ĂŞtre des perturbateurs endocriniens,
  • Les filtres inorganiques sont moins esthĂ©tiques s’ils ne sont pas micronisĂ©s (rĂ©duits en nanoparticules) mais sont plus photostables et inertes. Par consĂ©quent, choisir un produit solaire Ă  filtre complètement inorganique peut ĂŞtre un bon choix pour les personnes ayant des peaux sensibles,
  • les nanoparticules sont de plus en plus utilisĂ©es mais on ne sait toujours pas si elles sont nocives pour la santĂ© lorsqu’elles pĂ©nètrent dans les couches de la peau.

Dans les prochains articles, je me concentrerai sur les informations affichĂ©es sur les emballages afin que vous puissiez choisir le bon produit et sur certains ingrĂ©dients chimiques (dont j’ai brièvement parlĂ© dans le prĂ©sent article) que vous pourriez avoir besoin de surveiller.

Préférez-vous les crèmes solaires organiques, inorganiques ou combinées ? Laisser un commentaire !

5. References

(1) S. K. Jain, 2010, Multiparticulate carriers for sun-screening agents, Review in International Journal of Cosmetic Science, Volume 32, Issue 2, Pages 89–98.

(2) Wang SQ, 2010, Photoprotection: a review of the current and future technologies, Review in Dermatol Ther., 23(1):31-47.

(3) Sasseville D, Nantel-Battista M, Molinari R, 2011, Multiple contact allergies to benzophenones, Contact Dermatitis., 65(3):179-81.

(4) Robert Baan, 2006, Carcinogenicity of carbon black, titanium dioxide, and talc, Review in The Lancet, Volume 7, No. 4, p295–296.

(5) Warwick L. Morison, and Steve Q. Wang, Sunscreens: Safe and Effective?, skincancer.org

(6) Jiaying Wang, Liumeng Pan, Shenggan Wu, 2016, Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters, Int J Environ Res Public Health., 13(8): 782.

(7) Threes G Smijs, 2011, Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles in sunscreens: focus on their safety and effectiveness, Review in Nanotechnol Sci Appl., 4: 95–112.

Back to top / Retour en haut

Related Post

UV filters to watch out! Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 4—Les filtres UV à surveiller ! Les Protections solaires et la peau – 4ème Partie 🇬🇧 Are you worried about the safety of the sunscreen's filters? Discover those the most concerning and why. 🇫🇷 Vous vous interrogez sur l'innocuité des filtres UV ? Découvrez ceux les moins recommand...
SPF, PA+, PPD explained Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 3—FPS, PA+, PPD pour les nuls Les Protections solaires et la peau – 3ème Partie 🇬🇧 When choosing a sunscreen, what do the numbers and information mean on the packaging? 🇫🇷 A l'achat d'une crème solaire, que signifient les informations et chiffres sur le produit ?
How Broadspectrum Sunscreens work Sunscreens and Your Skin – Part 1—Comment les crèmes solaires fonctionnent Les Protections solaires et la peau – 1ère Partie 🇬🇧 Do you know how sunscreens work? In this part 1 article, we'll see what broadspectrum sunscreens means and what the filters used are. 🇫🇷 Savez-vous comment les solaires fonctionnent ? Dans ce 1er ...
Is Infrared Light Bad For Your Skin?—Les Infrarouges Sont-Ils Mauvais Pour la Peau ? 🇬🇧 Infrared is part of sunlight. Is it bad for our skin like ultraviolet rays? Let’s see what the science says! 🇫🇷 Le rayonnement infrarouge du soleil est-il mauvais pour la peau ? Voyons ce qu'en di...

Leave a reply / Laisser un commentaire

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * / Votre adresse mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs requis sont accompagnés de *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.